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  • Preoperative grip strength may predict shoulder strength after RSA

    Published results showed preoperative grip strength positively correlated with shoulder strength and function after reverse shoulder arthroplasty and may work as a prediction tool for outcomes in these patients.

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  • Surgical Intervention Following a First Traumatic Anterior Shoulder Dislocation is Worthy of Consideration

    Up to 60% of patients experience recurrence after a first traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation (FTASD), which is often defined as having experienced either dislocation or subluxation. Thus, surgical intervention following a FTASD is worthy of consideration and is guided by the number of patients that need to receive surgical intervention to prevent one redislocation (i.e., Number Needed to Treat), (subjective) health benefit, complication risk, and costs.

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  • Patients had improvements in sleep comfortability following shoulder arthroplasty

    Results published in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery found patients who underwent anatomic total or reverse shoulder arthroplasty had “significant and rapid” improvements in sleep disturbance after surgery.

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  • Shoulder Dislocation Symptoms and Treatment

    A shoulder dislocation is an injury that occurs when the ball of the ball-and-socket shoulder joint is separated from its normal position. The ball comes out of the socket of the shoulder. When this occurs, the ball may stay out of the shoulder and need to be put back into place, or it can slide back into normal position on its own.

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  • Treatment Options for Calcific Tendonitis of the Shoulder

    Calcific tendonitis is a common source of shoulder pain and can be a frustration given the severity of pain and the duration of symptoms. However, the news is not all bad! On a positive note, the vast majority of patients do find relief with nonsurgical treatments for this condition. In fact, studies have shown about 75 percent success with simple steps for treatment. While treatment often takes 3 to 6 months, there are typically improvements without having to undergo a surgical procedure.

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  • An Overview of Shoulder Blade Pain

    Shoulder blade pain can have many different causes. Although you may assume you sustained an injury or simply slept in the wrong way, the pain might actually be related to your heart, lungs, spine, abdomen, or pelvis. In cases like these, the pain may be referred, meaning that a problem in one part of the body excites nerves that trigger pain in another part of the body, such as your shoulder blade.

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